Projects

LAPO C4 Project

The LAPOC4 Project

One of LAPO’s key operating assumptions is that poverty is further reinforced by diseases and ignorance. The LAPOCommunity Campaign for Cancer Control (LAPOC4 Project) is therefore an intervention aimed at supporting efforts by the Government of Nigeria (GoN) to control cancer amongst the general population through policy and media advocacy, social mobilisation for uptake of screening services and strengthening referral linkages from community, primary healthcare to secondary or tertiary centres for cancer prevention, care and palliation.

The LAPO C4 Project is being implemented in FCT (Abuja), Lagos, Edo, Rivers and Imo State. Nigeria, with a population of 170,123,740 is the most populous country in Africa and the seventh most populous in the world. Its gross national income per head in 2012 was US$2700 (at purchasing power parity). According to GLOBOCAN data, almost 102,000 new cases of cancer occur annually in the country, and 75,000 deaths per year are caused by malignant diseases. 5-year prevalence in the adult population is roughly 223,000. Recent data provided by smaller population-based and hospital-based registries suggests that cancer incidence is increasing in the country. The global burden of cancer, one of the major causes of mortality worldwide is high. WHO estimates that there are 14.1 million new cases of cancer and 8.2 million deaths yearly. There are 32.6 million people living with cancer worldwide. 60 per cent of cancer cases occur in women due to breast and cervical cancer while liver and prostate cancers are common among men. However, with early detection, over 80 per cent of cancer cases are preventable while 40 per cent of the disease can be prevented by changes in life style. The main barriers to cancer control in Nigeria include non-efficient policy, insufficient public funding, poor access to screening services for early detection, poor referral linkages between community and health centres, insufficient cancer treatment centres and inadequate awareness.